sessions

Panel Discussion on “Co-Creation” #CeDEM16

CeDEM – the international Conference for e-Democracy and Open Government – brings together e-democracy, e-participation and open government specialists working in academia, politics, government and business to critically analyse the innovations, issues, ideas and challenges in the networked societies of the digital age. The CeDEM16 will be held from May 18th to May 20th 2016 at the Danube University Krems.

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Panel Discussion on “Co-Creation” (co-operation and participation in political and administrative processes)

Panel experts


Ursula Rosenbichler: Our department is currently dealing with the largest change processes, affecting 140.000 civil servants. We would like to address those changes with Wirkungsorientierter Verwaltungsführung (a concept tightly related to evidence based policy making).  We think this is the way out to address the major challenges such as the complexity in policy fields, the dilemma of economic growth vs. environment pollution or the aging society. The administration is repeatedly asking itself:

  1. How will we be able to provide services at the same quality level in the future?
  2. How can we tap innovation circles in the area of tension between flexibility vs. stability?
  3. How can the administration meet the growing expectations of citizens to cooperate and co-create?

The administration is expected to meet these challenges without additional financial resources. We will not remain successful if we give answers from the past. A promising solution to these challenges are innovation labs. Therefore we created Govlab Austria, an entity founded between the Austrian Chancellery and Danube University Krems. The aim was to create a free sphere between academia, society, and economy to develop sustainable solutions. Crucial factors will be:

  1. Overcome boundaries set by rules and regulations;
  2. Create experiments without the fear to be showcased when something fails;
  3. Do things in a different way.

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Keynote Robert Krimmer: Is there an Estonian E-Democracy? Co-Creation in the Digital State #cedem16

Robert Krimmer held his keynote “Is there an Estonian E-Democracy? Co-Creation in the Digital State” at the CeDEM16.

krimmer-tRobert Krimmer
Robert Krimmer is Full Professor of e-Governance within Ragnar Nurkse School of Innovation and Governance at the Faculty of Social Science, in Tallinn University of Technology, Estonia. He is focusing on electronic participation and democracy, as well as e-voting, the transformation of the public sector, and all issues further developing a digital society. Associate Editor of the international scientific journal Government Information Quarterly (GIQ) where he is in charge of participation issues. He has been one of the lead experts for the Council of Europe Ad-Hoc Committee on Electronic Democracy and drafted Annex 1 of the CoE Recommendation (2009)1 on e-Democracy. Teaching on e-Governance, e-Democracy, incl. e-Participation and e-Voting as well as End-User Management Information Systems at Tallinn University of Technology, University of Applied Sciences Hagenberg, Danube University Krems, and WU Vienna University of Economics and Business. Mentor of more than twenty graduation theses. Author and/or editor of ten books/special issues of scientific journals. Author of some 80 international scientific articles. He has been cited some 640 times with an Hirsch index of 13 according to Google Scholar.

CeDEM16
CeDEM – the international Conference for e-Democracy and Open Government – brings together e-democracy, e-participation and open government specialists working in academia, politics, government and business to critically analyse the innovations, issues, ideas and challenges in the networked societies of the digital age. The CeDEM16 will be held from May 18th to May 20th 2016 at the Danube University Krems.

» More about the CeDEM16
» All CeDEM16 Sessions

Get access to the presentation

Is there an Estonian E-Democracy? Co-Creation in the Digital State

Estonia, a country with a population of 1,3 Million and a size of over 45.000 square kilometers, has used an opportunity to start from the scratch. Originally, it was intended to use digital means instead of paper based processes. Estonia’s schools and government organisations are 100% connected and ICT equipped. Programming is part of the syllabus of general public schools.

75% of homes have broadband access. If an amount of more than 400 Euros shall be transferred electronically, the digital ID will always be required. Apart from online tax declarations, Estonia also promotes electronic voting. Estonia is called a digital state, “E-stonia” is almost a branding of a nation. The understanding of data protection in Austria and in Estonia is completely different.

What is co-creation?

The general idea of involving citizens to building public services (co-creation) can be defined as the involvement of citizens in the initiation and/or the design process of public services in order to (co)create beneficial outcomes. So, citizens may have an idea or be involved in implementing a project. Citizens as co-initiators points to them having an idea and the public hand implementing the project. Citizens can also be co-designer or co-implementers.

Factors influencing co-creation and its outcomes

Factors influencing co-creation on governmental side encompass aspects like the attitude of public officials. On the citizen side, the attitude and experience of citizens towards participation amongst others is important.

Outcomes of co-creation can be suggestions for improving efficiency to improve new products or services, which approach originates from the economy offering “design yourself”-products online. Co-creation can have an impact on the society itself through bringing people together. Assessments before and after co-creation would be of great value.

Estonian e-democracy instruments

With the objective to strengthen effectiveness and efficiency of E-Governance encompassing e-government and e-democracy, concepts like the eID were implemented. An e-democracy instrument used in Estonia is f.i. TOM, a tool for agenda setting through citizens (which can be compared to the Austrian “Volksbegehren”). Discussions of law proposals through a consultation tool happened through Osale.ee, an improved TOM. Rahvakogu, a platform for proposals for improving laws, was initiated by the Estonian president, supported by NGOs. The co-creation within Rahvakogu was really limited.

Internet-Voting

Estonian Internet Voting is outstanding. The first e-enabled elections were done on the municipal level. Continuous improvement is necessary and it needs time to build trust. There is no co-creational aspect in internet-voting, but in the initiatives of TOM& Osale.ee, citizens were co-initiators, while in Rahvakogu, citizens were co-designers. Internet voting – in contrast to the other initiatives – is in fact used today.

Summary

To summarize, Estonia has succeeded in its nation using internet voting. Internet voting is not an e-democracy in itself, though. Estonia is a digital state, but there is a lack of participatory aspects. E-participation efforts have failed so far because of a lack of social capital or impact.

Further Information about Robert Krimmer: http://www.ttu.ee/en/?id=97678

Keynote Hans Jochen Scholl: Profiling the Academic Domain of Digital Democracy and Government #cedem16

Hans Jochen Scholl, full Professor in University of Washington’s Information School (US), held his keynote “Profiling the Academic Domain of Digital Democracy and Government” at the CeDEM16.

Jochen_portrait_2015Hans Jochen Scholl
Hans Jochen Scholl is a Full Professor with tenure in the University of Washington’s Information School (Seattle, WA). In his public sector-related research Dr. Scholl’s special interests include smart governance, disaster sciences, interoperability, and information artifact evaluation in government. He served as President of the Digital Government Society from 2010 to 2011 and serves as Chair of the IFIP Working Group 8.5 (Information Systems in Public Administration). Dr. Scholl chairs the Electronic Government Track at the Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS) and co-organizes the European IFIP EGOV conferences. He also supervises the maintenance of the Electronic Government Reference Library (EGRL), which is chartered to identify and include all peer-reviewed English-language publications on electronic government worldwide.

CeDEM16
CeDEM – the international Conference for e-Democracy and Open Government – brings together e-democracy, e-participation and open government specialists working in academia, politics, government and business to critically analyse the innovations, issues, ideas and challenges in the networked societies of the digital age. The CeDEM16 will be held from May 18th to May 20th 2016 at the Danube University Krems.

» More about the CeDEM16
» All CeDEM16 Sessions

Get access to the presentation

Profiling the Academic Domain of Digital Democracy and Government

The research domain of digital democracy and government is of about full age. There is a dual view, on the one hand a more administration-centric perspective is looking at how services and processes could be improved. At the same time government should be more transparent and open and citizens should participate in governments’ decision-making more than just through voting. Academics interested in the study field became more and more numerous, coming from different fields (such as political science, biology, information science, geography etc.).

Different academic backgrounds

Being used to different standards, these people were doing workshops and were arguing how to do research. They were interested in the same topic, but asked themselves questions like “If I do research in this area of digital democracy, how will that stand with my colleague in information systems research?” Disciplinary diversity, funding, tenuring etc. was discussed. Looking into the body of knowledge in digital democracy, you see quite few collaborations you don’t see in other study domains. One way of evolution is a structure of a study domain and the self-organization. What we do has practical impact, it matters to practitioners.

Impact and reflection

What sets us apart is the projects involving practitioners. Very early on colleagues begun to reflect the study domain. F.i. Grönlund (2003) stated, the theory would be missing in the study domain. There is a tradition on reflecting the domain itself. Looking at the domain of digital democracy and government, unifying theories and uniform procedures and methods were missing in 2006 and are missing still. Scholars identifying themselves as scholars of the domain, special journals (such as GIQ), conferences and the Electronic Government Reference Library (2005: 992 References of peer-reviewed publications) provide the domain with identity and structure.

Electronic Government Reference Library

As a reviewer or as an author of a paper, the search within EGRL gives an overview of what is known about a topic and trends in the study domain. The EGRL is also a tool to do some analysis to identify who publishes on what issues or where scholars focusing on specific issues are located geographically. The EGRL becomes more and more important for hiring decisions and questions like salary adjustments. Analysis of measures like productivity of scholars is possible based on the number of entries in the EGRL. Most of the authors of the EGRL are also members of the EGOV-List (egov-list@uw.edu).

Indices provide an impression of how productive a scholar is, but how good are these quantitative measures?

Indices are based on different data as f.i. they count citations only of approved journals or include conferences proceedings. Sometimes a high citation index refers mostly to only one paper of a scholar. The H-Index (Jorge E. Hirsch 2005) also gives an idea of who is having what impact in this area. These measures are good enough and at the same time they are not. Lead authorships should also be taken into account. Also single authorships or the average number of co-authorships are indicative as there are scholars with few or no lead co-authorships, but with a relatively high citation index. Also projects supervised and completed and other aspects should be taken into account. The scholar’s unique signature should be captured.

Summary

To put it in a nutshell, the average annual growth of publications in the domain (over 20% in peer reviewed publications) is outstandingly high. The domain has passed its infancy and established a multi disciplinary mode of operations. Measurements are necessary but too incomplete to measure the impact of an individual scholar.

Further Information about Hans Jochen Scholl: http://faculty.washington.edu/jscholl/

Open Collaborative Government #CeDEM16

CeDEM16
CeDEM – the international Conference for e-Democracy and Open Government – brings together e-democracy, e-participation and open government specialists working in academia, politics, government and business to critically analyse the innovations, issues, ideas and challenges in the networked societies of the digital age. The CeDEM16 will be held from May 18th to May 20th 2016 at the Danube University Krems.

» More about the CeDEM16
» All CeDEM16 Sessions

 

Open Collaborative Government

  • ICT-Enabled Social Innovations in Social Services: Mapping the Evidence (Christian Voigt, Gianluca Misuraca, Fiorenza Lipparini and Csaba Kucsera)
  • Structural Conditions for Citizen Deliberation: A Conceptual Scheme for the Assessment of “New” Parties (Maria Haberer and Ismael Peña-López)
  • The Path from E-Government to Open Government in Vietnam: Dealing with the Openness Dilemma (Tran Van Long)

ICT-Enabled Social Innovations in Social Services: Mapping the Evidence (Christian Voigt, Gianluca Misuraca, Fiorenza Lipparini and Csaba Kucsera)

SIP (Social Investment Package), social investment in the people is a target of the EU. Christian Voigt presents only a part of a large study conducted by the authors. Social investment is investing into the development of the people, contrary to aids by the government that help people if they are in need, like unemployment aid. How can ICT-enabled social innovation support social investment policies, or integrated approaches to social service delivery? Social innovation can be seen as: need driven production, open process of co-creation, public value allocation, changes stakeholder relationship. Innovation classification was clustered as incremental, organisational, disruptive, radical/transformative innovation. …

 

Structural Conditions for Citizen Deliberation: A Conceptual Scheme for the Assessment of “New” Parties (Maria Haberer and Ismael Peña-López)

Maria Haberer elaborated on their definition of new parties and what they need to be created with a relevant narrative (5-Stars, Podemos, Occupy Wallstreet).  Deliberative democracy was defined in the context of participatory and discursive democracy. “Barcelona En Comú” was chosen as case study for new party development. A participatory platform was put online with about 24.000 users that were citizens of Barcelona. The authors looked at specific neighbourhoods as samples. A mix of methods was chosen to analyse the participatory processes on different levels. …

 

 

The Path from E-Government to Open Government in Vietnam: Dealing with the Openness Dilemma (Tran Van Long)

How can e-government facilitate open government? The openness dilemma describes the advantages of openness and transparency in contrast to the need to protect information. E-government does not necessarily lead to e-democracy or open government. There is global pressure as well as domestic demand for e-government in Vietnam. The e-government readiness index shows slow but constant increase in Vietnam, while e-participation index fluctuates each year and consistent development on the e-participation index cannot be stated yet. For instance, the freedom of the press in Vietnam decreases each year. Authoritarian regimes all have to deal with the openness dilemma. …

 

#GovCamp 2015 – 17 Sessions und 150 TeilnehmerInnen #review

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17 Sessions und mehr als 150 TeilnehmerInnen waren beim bereits sechsten GovCamp am 1. Dezember 2015 mit dabei. Die als Barcamp konzipierte Veranstaltung ermöglichte einen Tag lang den offenen Austausch, Inspiration und Reflexion für neue Wege der Zusammenarbeit zwischen Verwaltung, Zivilgesellschaft, Forschung, Wirtschaft und Politik. Zur Nachlese: Wir haben für euch bei den einzelnen Sessions mitgeschrieben.

 

Danke den OrganisatorInnen, GastgeberInnen und UnterstützerInnen.

gastgeber stadt wien
Stadt Wien (Gastgeber)
org_dialogplus org_duk
Dialog Plus (Org.) Donau Uni (Org.)
sup_brz 20150407_tinavienna_logo_4c_orginal sup_ait sup_forms
BRZ (Unterstützer) adforms2web (Unterstützer) Austrian Institute of Technology (Unterstützer) tina vienna (Unterstützer)

 

 

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Das #govcamp startet! Die Eröffnungsreden im Wortlaut.
User Experience User Research (S. Murth)
Off-/Online-Teilhabe in der Zivilgesellschaft (U. Seethaler)
Re:Think Austria (A. Kovar, M. Tesslaar)
#GovCamp: Spielifizierte Beteiligung (S. Thiel, M. Sachs)
Regierungsprogramm #rotgrün: Kap. 11 (P. Kühnberger, M. Mock)
#Wien2020  als Musterbeispiel der Transparenz (A. Surowiec)
DIY und DIT Demo?kratie Repair-Café (@igdemokratie)
Digitale Agenda Wien: jetzt wird’s konkret! (M.l Hagler)
Stammtisch 3.0 Dynamic Facilitation Bürgerrat
Public Transport Data (R. Harm, S. Hauk, D. Blauensteiner)
Open Data und Genealogie (M. Eisenriegler)
Qualität und Usability von offenen Daten (J. Höchtl)
Digitaler Wandel und Politik # besserentscheiden (A. Kovar)