EGOV-CeDEM-ePart 2018 Call for Papers

Logo_EGOV-CeDEM-EPART 2018_web

EGOV-CeDEM-ePart 2018 represents the merge of the IFIP EGOV-ePart  with the CeDEM conference as well as the annual conference of the IFIP Working Group 8.5. The conference is held annually, and will be hosted 3-5 September 2018 at the Danube University Krems in Austria.

We invite individuals from academic and applied backgrounds as well as from business, public authorities, NGOs, NPOs and education institutions to submit their research papers, reflections, posters as well as practitioner papers, panel or workshop proposals to the topics addressed in the tracks. The conference also offers a PhD Colloquium as well as a limited number of PhD bursaries. We welcome completed and ongoing research papers, workshop and panel proposals, reflections&viewpoints,  posters and practitioners’ papers.


  • General E-Government & Open Government
  • General e-Democracy & e-Participation
  • Smart Governance (Government, Cities & Regions)
  • AI, Data Analytics and Automated Decision Making
  • Digital Collaboration and Social Media
  • Policy Modeling and Policy Informatics
  • Social Innovation
  • Open Data, Linked Data & Semantic Web
  • Practitioners’ Track
  • PhD Colloquium


  • (Hard) deadline for submissions: 17 March 2018
  • Notification of acceptance: 30 April 2018
  • Camera-ready paper submission and author registration: 1 June 2018
  • Conference: 3-5 September 2018
  • PhD Colloquium: 2 September 2018

Further Details


We look forward to seeing you!

Peter, Olivier, Marijn, Jochen, Efthimios (Conference Chairs) & Noella (Local Host Chair)

Day 1: ICEDEG 2017 in Quito, Ecuador

19-21 April in Quito, Ecuador

20170418_213832 Quito, looking down.

Quito, looking up.

After more than 1/2 day spent in the air, I arrived to Quito to attend the ICEDEG 2017 chaired by Andreas Meier (University of Fribourg, CH) and Luis Terán (University of Fribourg, CH & Universidad de las Fuerzas Armadas (ESPE), EC).

20170418_160106 Rain, forecast for the whole week.

Programme and details available here:


Todd O’Boyle in 10 sentences #CeDEM17

Todd O’Boyle is one of our keynote-speaker at the CeDEM17 at the Danube University Krems in May 2017.  We asked him to send us 10 sentences about his keynote, his expectations of CeDEM17 and his vision of the future.

CeDEM17 – International Conference for E-Democracy and Open Government 2017 (17.05-19.05.2017)
Registration open

Todd O’Boyle (Next Century Cities, US) on “Digital Tools and Digital Democracy: US Cities and Civil Society in 2017”
Todd O’Boyle serves as Deputy Director of Next Century Cities, where he is overseeing the launch of the new Next Generation Engagement Awards to promote innovative citizen engagement and digital inclusion strategies in gigabit cities. He also works to shape strategy and organizational direction and policy priorities.
Prior to joining Next Century Cities, former Federal Communications Commission Chairman Michael Copps picked Todd to launch his Media and Democracy Reform Initiative at Common Cause, a non-partisan good government organization. In that capacity, Todd directed public interest communications policy campaigns, including successful efforts to guarantee the Open Internet (network neutrality); protect and promote competition; and stop Comcast’s bid to acquire rival Time Warner Cable. Regularly quoted in the national, local, and specialized media, as Program Director, he also managed legislative and regulatory outreach, grassroots engagement, and development relations.
Todd has experience in the academic and political worlds, having taught communications policy and worked in grassroots campaigns for nearly a decade. He has a Ph.D. in Public Policy from the University of Delaware.


What are the main assets of your keynote?
What are your expectations of CeDEM17?
What is your vision of the future?

  1. Even at a time of one-party rule in Washington, DC, the American federal government is sclerotic.
  2. On the one hand, the American citizenry is more engaged than ever witness record-setting protests, congressional town halls over capacity, etc.
  3. On the other, Americans feel an unprecedented level of isolation from and disapproval of their representatives in Washington, DC.
  4. Meanwhile, the United States has a long history of state and local government level policy innovation i.e.) the *laboratories of democracy.*
  5. So years of federal gridlock have bred innovation in open government, direct democracy, and citizen participation at the local level.
  6. Digital technologies offer unparalleled opportunities for engagement, entrenching systemic bias in decision-making towards the privileged.
  7. However, the disconnected may miss out on important governance decisions.
  8. The American voluntary and philanthropic sectors have a long history of local partnerships to remedy social problems with out-of-the-box solutions.
  9. Foundations and philanthropies can partner with non-profits to identify promising ideas, fund them, and broadcast them.
  10. The Benton Next Generation Engagement Awards offers an important model for rewarding innovative digital civic engagement that offer citizens a greater say in how their communities are organized and run.


CeDEM17 – International Conference for E-Democracy and Open Government 2017 (17.05-19.05.2017)
Registration open

CeDem Asia 2016, Day 1, Afternoon Presentations

Ivo Babaja: Open Government and National Sovereignity

The International Open Data (OD) Charter developed by GGP (Open Government Partnerships) and international organizations declares that OD should be made available to the widest of users by anyone, anywhere. This is included in some national legislations. on the other hand this principle stands in clear opposition to the principle of national sovereignity. OD initiatives could be perceived as disruptive innovations. Assessing e-government initiatives from the point of disruptive businesses, they can be evaluated using two factors: impact (how much it changes the system) and rationality (how much the impact is reasonable). Rationality is actually not existent, and impact is presumed to be low. The global openness request stands in opposition to our “competitive edge”. It may also introduce uncertainty about the ultimate goals of the e-government process and ideas.


Morten Meyerhoff Nielsen: E-government and governance: The Danish-Japanese timelines and models compared


Join us at the Conference for E-Democracy and Open Government 2016 in Asia or Submit for 2017 in Austria

In 2007 the Centre for E-Governance began organising conferences on e-democracy and public administration and since  2014, CeDEM is also held biennially in Asia.

We invite individuals from academic and applied backgrounds as well as business, public authorities, NGOs, NPOs and education institutions to join us and submit their work to the topics addressed in the tracks. We welcome interdisciplinary and critical approaches to the conference topics. (more…)