cedemasia

CeDEMAsia2016: Paper Presentations Parallel Session A, Day 2

Heike Hermann: The promises of digital political communication and the reality in South Korea

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While South Koreans are frequent users of social media, politicians have not yet embraced these communication channels to engage with citizens. The most popular digital communication tool is Kakao Talk, which is used by 37 million users. Kakao Talk provides closed space for communication. Facebook and Twitter are public social media and popular in Korea, but politicians are only followed by a few numbers of people. A quarter of politicians on public social media is not or not very active. Most items posted are news items often about the politicians themselves and the posts are often not about policy. 3/4 of politicians do not respond to comments, hence politicians don’t really engage with citizens via Facebook. Most politicians have a Twitter account and two thirds actually use it. However, only 10 percent of politicians have more than 15000 followers which is not a lot considering the Korean population. Twitter is mainly used for engagement with news agents and similar.

Dal Yong Jin: Understanding of Smartphone Divide: From Digital Divide to Digital Inclusion in the Smartphone Era

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Over the last 20 years, Korea had great development in the ICT infrastructure. It was expected that smartphones would bridge the social and digital divide, but it has not quite been up to expectations. There are two major problems in the discourse of the digital divide: (1) Inequality in physical access to the technology and (2) the knowledge to use ICT effectively. Koreans must spend among the most money on communications. While the first divide will disappear in the future, the second divide – usage skills – is systematic and structural problem.

Ben Huffman: E-Participation in the Governance Process: Redefining its Worth and Modality

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Focus of the talk is the Philippines that made good progress in the global e-participation index. Physical access is a core factor in these rankings, but capability to make use of the access is almost equally important. In the Philippines, free internet access is facilitated to make use of governmental services. The e-government services are provided in English, but this is language barrier, as there are 2 national languages and 8 dialects in the Philippines. The e-government service might also intend to train English of the citizens, which should be realised differently. Other barriers are the need to login in at some public access points, as not all that have access to an interne access point have login data.

PRESENTATION-LINK

Robert Krimmer: Internet Voting: Elections in the (European) Cloud

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Estonia is often narrowed down to e-stonia as they have implemented and use many electronic services. The talk discusses, why do some countries use e-voting and why do some countries not use e-voting? The use of technology and innovations in voting processes happens already in ancient Greece and Rome, and the use of paper ballots is also use of technology that was not there before. Casting votes in parliaments often happens with the use of electronic devices nowadays. By using the electronic voting you change the electorate, as people from elsewhere can participate. Especially for citizens that are abroad, voting ins difficult, as they can go to embassy or send their ballot via mail (which is getting slower). Internet voting is not about democracy but it is a service to make citizens participate in elections.

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CeDEM Asia 2016: Day 2, „Motivation(s) behind Open Access Publishing” (Workshop)

Workshop „Motivation(s) behind Open Access Publishing”

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Workshop by Noella Edelmann & Judith Schossböck

The project outline presented in this workshop is to access the motivational factors in Open Access publishing.

Judith Schossböck presented the “green way” of publishing, which means to publish in repositories. The “golden way” means to publish in Open Access journals. She pointed out, that “the character of the electronic academic journal is changing rapidly as new technologies, reader habits, and patterns of communication evolve and the Internet is increasingly adopted as a common medium.”

The journal JeDEM – eJournal for eDemocracy and Open Government is publishing since 2009 and the editors want to evaluate the motivations of the authors to publish in an Open Access Journal. Publishing in JeDEM is free of charge.

Which research questions will be examined during their study on motivational factors in Open Access publishing?

  • Can we distinguish differences in motivation for publishing in open access across disciplines or countries?
  • What type of users are JeDEM users? How can users be classified according to their motivations? What are users’ opinions on different aspects of open access publishing, e.g. open peer review etc.?
  • How can these results help other e-publishers?

We are looking forward to their results!

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CeDem Asia 2016, Day 1, Afternoon Presentations

Ivo Babaja: Open Government and National Sovereignity

The International Open Data (OD) Charter developed by GGP (Open Government Partnerships) and international organizations declares that OD should be made available to the widest of users by anyone, anywhere. This is included in some national legislations. on the other hand this principle stands in clear opposition to the principle of national sovereignity. OD initiatives could be perceived as disruptive innovations. Assessing e-government initiatives from the point of disruptive businesses, they can be evaluated using two factors: impact (how much it changes the system) and rationality (how much the impact is reasonable). Rationality is actually not existent, and impact is presumed to be low. The global openness request stands in opposition to our “competitive edge”. It may also introduce uncertainty about the ultimate goals of the e-government process and ideas.

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Morten Meyerhoff Nielsen: E-government and governance: The Danish-Japanese timelines and models compared

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CeDEM Asia, Keynotes, Day 1 (Daegu)

The 3rd CeDEM Asia started on the 7th of December in Daegu (South Korea). CeDEM brings together researchers, practitioneers and activists from many contexts in the region. President Faulhammer welcomed the participants and mentioned Korea as one of the leading industries in information technologies as well as the dedicated open access policy of CeDEM. Since the beginning of the conference series, emphasis was on the paradigm shifts due to ICTs and the development of civic involvement in society, and the creation of a network of tolerance, innovative spirit and innovation. The Centre for E-Governance has come to stand to a leading research group with many international cooperations and projects, and CeDEM Asia is an important part for the engagement of Danube University in the Asien region. Prof. Parycek emphasised that CeDEM Asia has a focus on communication and networks. Prof. Skoric mentioned the national context of the conference series and invited people to suggest cities for the next one. So if you are in Asia and want to host CeDEM 2018, do get in touch!

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Rajiv Aricat and Rich Ling: Rag-picking and mobile telephony in Myanmar

PRESENTATION-LINK

The Myanmar society has seen an ongoing process of liberalization and is moving towards a mixed economy after the country was under military rule. In the presented study mobile communication was studied since 2014 in six months of field work. Rag-picking  refers to picking up different types of waste. (more…)

Join us at the Conference for E-Democracy and Open Government 2016 in Asia or Submit for 2017 in Austria

In 2007 the Centre for E-Governance began organising conferences on e-democracy and public administration and since  2014, CeDEM is also held biennially in Asia.

We invite individuals from academic and applied backgrounds as well as business, public authorities, NGOs, NPOs and education institutions to join us and submit their work to the topics addressed in the tracks. We welcome interdisciplinary and critical approaches to the conference topics. (more…)