cedem16sessions

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CeDEM16: Summary

CeDEM16
CeDEM – the international Conference for e-Democracy and Open Government – brings together e-democracy, e-participation and open government specialists working in academia, politics, government and business to critically analyse the innovations, issues, ideas and challenges in the networked societies of the digital age. The CeDEM16 was held from May 18th to May 20th 2016 at the Danube University Krems.

» More about the CeDEM16
» CeDEM16 Programme
» All CeDEM16 Sessions

CeDEM16 is special as it means that we have been organising conferences on e-democracy for 10 years. During these years  changes and improvements have resulted in an increase in the quality of the conference and its outcomes. We hope you enjoyed the keynotes, the *new* Experts’ Panel on Co-Operation, the paper sessions, workshops, the  Open Space and the PhD Colloquium at CeDEM16:

Keynotes

Keynote Hans Jochen Scholl
Profiling the Academic Domain of Digital Democracy and Government
Keynote Robert Krimmer
Is there an Estonian E-Democracy? Co-Creation in the Digital State
Keynote Mila Gascó
Co-Production and ICT-enabled Co-Production
Keynote Efthimios Tambouris
Multidimensional Open Government Data

5 questions to Peter Parycek

5 questions to Peter Parycek

Gallery

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CeDEM16 Expert Panel Discussion

Panel Discussion on “Co-Creation” (co-operation and participation in political and administrative processes)

CeDEM16 Day 1

CeDEM16 Day 2

CeDEM16 Closing Session

CeDEM16 PhD Colloquium

CeDEM17: See you next year”

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Best Paper Award & Closing Session #cedem16

CeDEM16
CeDEM – the international Conference for e-Democracy and Open Government – brings together e-democracy, e-participation and open government specialists working in academia, politics, government and business to critically analyse the innovations, issues, ideas and challenges in the networked societies of the digital age. The CeDEM16 will be held from May 18th to May 20th 2016 at the Danube University Krems.

» More about the CeDEM16
» All CeDEM16 Sessions

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Best Paper Award

Gerlinde presented the CeDEM16 Best Paper Prize to Rebecca Rumbul (mySopciety, UK) for her paper ” Tools for transparency? Institutional barriers to effective civic technology in Latin America”.

20160519_173115

Closing Session

The members of the Center for E-Governance who summarised the sessions for this blog, also presented the main issues in the CeDEM16 topics and presented some future research questions they think should be addressed

  • Bettina Rinnerbauer: Keynotes
  • Thomas Lampoltshammer: Open Data
  • Malgorzata Goraczek: Information Visualization and  E-Democracy
  • Judith Schößbock: Social Media
  • Michael Sachs: Open Collaborative Government & CeDEMAsia16

CeDEM16 Summary

Gasco

Keynote Mila Gascó: Co-Production and ICT-enabled Co-Production #cedem16

Mila Gascó (Institute of Public Governance and Management ESADE) held her keynote “Co-Production and ICT-enabled Co-Production” at the CeDEM16.

Foto Mila Gascó (4)Mila Gascó
Mila Gascó holds a MBA and a Ph. D. in public policy evaluation (Award Enric Prat de la Riba granted to the best Ph. D. thesis on public management and administration, given by the Escola d’Administració Pública de Catalunya in Barcelona, Spain).

Nowadays, she is a senior researcher at the Institute of Innovation and Knowledge Management and the Institute of Public Governance and Management, both at ESADE. In the latter, she is in charge of the e-governance, open government and smart cities areas of research.  For seven years, she was a senior analyst at the International Institute on Governance of Catalonia. Mila Gascó has a lot of consulting experience on the information and knowledge society as well.

CeDEM16
CeDEM – the international Conference for e-Democracy and Open Government – brings together e-democracy, e-participation and open government specialists working in academia, politics, government and business to critically analyse the innovations, issues, ideas and challenges in the networked societies of the digital age. The CeDEM16 will be held from May 18th to May 20th 2016 at the Danube University Krems.

» More about the CeDEM16
» All CeDEM16 Sessions

Get access to the presentation

Open government can be defined as a transparent, collaborative and participative government, that mixes different ICT-tools in order to reach its objectives. Collaboration refers to the work of the public administration (internally and externally), which can be distinguished from participation. Social innovation is usually bottom-up led, while co-production is usually top-bottom-led. Co-production encompasses stakeholders and citizens in further developing public services (precise definition see OECD, 2011). Co-production can be shaped in co-commission over co-design, co-delivery and co-assessment.

Co-production, open innovation, ICT-enabled Co-production

Co-production is linked to open innovation: Based on Chesbrough, the open-innovation concept has been applied on the private sector. Approaches to apply this concept on the public sector were needed. Open Innovation means searching for solutions outside of organisational boundaries (Mergel and Desouza).

We used to co-produce before, but ICT makes it different nowadays and links it to open innovation. What has changed is the citizen-centricity. Public services can be made more efficient, but they will only be more effective if citizens’ opinions are taken into account.

Radical improvement of public services

If we take into account that co-production is about collaboration and that co-production makes things more effective, we can get improvement, but not radical improvement, if ICTs play a marginal role and there is a low involvement. If ICT is adopted in the public sector, there is the technocratic paradigm of e-government, when the involvement is low and the role of ICT is central. When a high level of involvement interacts with a high importance of technology, radical service improvement through open and inclusive e-governance, will be possible.  (Cucciniello & Nasi 2015)

Co-production-example

As example of using open data, developing apps and engaging people, inter alia rodalia.info (Spain) can be mentioned. Rodalia asks citizens and organisations to help identifying potential terroristic actions or related suspenses. Public administration can’t monitor everything, therefore, they co-produce.

Co-production can be seen in the actual building of an app (using open data to build the app) or also in using citizen feeds in order to make the app very useful.

Co-production from a historical perspective

We have always co-produced. Otherwise it would be impossible to deliver some services: A co-produced service is f.i. taking out garbage to make the collection and removal of garbage possible.

Factors influencing ICT-enabled co-production

Factors that influence ICT-enabled co-production (Voorberg et al. 2014, Cucciniello & Nasi, 2015) are

  • Organizational factors: A risk averse administration culture, the preparedness for participation (hierarchy? bureaucracy?) and an open attitude (The leadership decides to co-produce, but who really co-produces? The persons who undertake the role of co-producers shall have an open attitude too.) play a crucial role for co-production.
  • Citizens’ behaviour: People need to feel heard and want to improve things, which is why it should be made transparent, what contribution was helpful for what step or how their contribution was taken into account.
  • ICT factors

Summary

  • Not everyone wants or knows how to co-produce.
  • Co-production is not for free, it involves especially the resources of time and money.
  • Often, the process is much more important than the outcome itself. After a co-production process, we will come up with more empowered people.
  • Co-production does not need ICT, but the latter will speed up the co-production process.
  • ICT-enabled co-production is contextual, over all in organisation and design.

Further Information about Mila Gascó: http://www.esade.edu/research-webs/eng/igdp

Tambouris

Keynote Efthimios Tambouris: Multidimensional Open Government Data #cedem16

Efthimios Tambouris held his keynote “Multidimensional Open Government Data” at the CeDEM16.

Tambouris-profilEfthimios Tambouris
Efthimios Tambouris is an Associate Professor of “Information Systems and eGovernment” at the Department of Applied Informatics at the University of Macedonia, Thessaloniki, Greece. Before that, he served at Research Centers CERTH/ITI and NCSR ‘Demokritos’ and the ICT Industry. Dr. Tambouris holds a Diploma in Electrical Engineering from the National Technical University of Athens (NTUA), Greece, and an MSc and PhD from Brunel University, UK. During the last sixteen years he has initiated, coordinated and participated in numerous EU-funded research projects mainly in the field of eGovernment. He is an expert for the European Commission and CEN. He is co-chair of the IFIP International Conference on eParticipation (ePart) and has more than 150 scientific publications.

CeDEM16
CeDEM – the international Conference for e-Democracy and Open Government – brings together e-democracy, e-participation and open government specialists working in academia, politics, government and business to critically analyse the innovations, issues, ideas and challenges in the networked societies of the digital age. The CeDEM16 will be held from May 18th to May 20th 2016 at the Danube University Krems.

» More about the CeDEM16
» All CeDEM16 Sessions

Get access to the presentation

Efthimios Tambouris, Applied Informatics Dpt at University of Macedonia (GR), on “Multidimensional Open Government Data”

There are various open data portals and a lot of conceptual research has been conducted. When examining data portals, it becomes apparent, that the vast majority of the data are numbers (demographic, statistical data etc.). Statistical analyses, visualisations and the development of apps are possible.

What’s new in the OGD portals environment?

New is the fact, that one has access to so much data. Searching for international data might though be not too easy, because this would have to be done using different data portals. Looking at internet usage vs. individuals’ level of internet skills reveals certain correlations. To take one example, data.gov.uk was selected with the objective to get data on unemployment. This showed, finding the data even on only one data portal can be quite difficult, as the result were over 1000 excel files, which would have to be all opened manually. Data being located in excel or csv files and being distributed makes reaching good results challenging.

Usually, being provided only with a number doesn’t suffice to understand its meaning, as it is dependent on the context as f.i. what is measured and to what place the measurement – which is expressed through the number – refers.

Introducing Data Cubes

Statistical data can be compared to data cubes encompassing different dimensions. To stick to the example, such a dimension could be the age of a person if we deal with the issue of unemployment. Data can be rolled up or drilled down (in the sense of summarizing and climbing up a hierarchy or reducing a dimension on the one hand or going down a hierarchy), diced and also sliced, as is shown visually.

One challenge is the knowledge necessary for expanding cubes with data of different cubes. These different cubes could encompass the same dimensions, but comprise different measures.

Open Cube

The research project Open Cube deals with the question of how publishers can publish their content in cubes and how users can make use of it.

Finding data stored in different countries’ portals

Through the internet, within one’s working environment a SPARQL query can be issued and an answer is transferred, provided that the data is stored in the RDF-format. This can also be applied with different sources, which would solve the problem of linking open data portals. With reference to Tim Berners Lee’s 5-star model, a portal publishing data in RDF should be assigned with four stars, while providing Linked Open Data is seen as 5-star-procedure. The RDF Data Cube Vocabulary allows to model multi-dimensional data as RDF-graphs.

Expander suggests improvements

There is a need for tools in order to start with your own data if you want to create statistical cubes and there are lots of tools, starting from XLS and CSV. New is the expander, which was added to the cube structure and the data (table view). A compatibility-check is done by the software and makes suggestions to supplement the data with f.i. newer data on the same issue. The tool supports different visualisation techniques and enables f.i. comparisons of data of the same topic from different regions (as f.i. employment data).

 

See http://opengovintelligence.eu/

Further Information about Efthimios Tambouris: http://uom-gr.academia.edu/tambouris

Information Visualization for the People #cedem16

The focus of this track was to show which and how different datasets can be used to create information visualization and simulation of the political discourse.

CeDEM16
CeDEM – the international Conference for e-Democracy and Open Government – brings together e-democracy, e-participation and open government specialists working in academia, politics, government and business to critically analyse the innovations, issues, ideas and challenges in the networked societies of the digital age. The CeDEM16 will be held from May 18th to May 20th 2016 at the Danube University Krems.

» More about the CeDEM16
» All CeDEM16 Sessions

Information Vizualization for the people

Chair: Florian Windhager

      • Innovating Good Regulatory Practice Using Mixed-Initiative Social Media Analytics and Visualization (Victoria Lemieux)
      • Supporting Cognition in the Face of Political Data and Discourse: A Mental Models Perspective on Designing Information Visualization Systems (Günther Schreder, Florian Windhager, Michael Smuc and Eva Mayr)
      • Current Barriers to Open Government Data Use and Visualization by Political Intermediaries (Jérôme Brugger, Marianne Fraefel, Hansjakob Fehr, Daniel Schöneck, Christoph Stähli Weissbrod and Reinhard Riedl)

Innovating Good Regulatory Practice Using Mixed-Initiative Social Media Analytics and Visualization (Victoria Lemieux)

IV

This presentation discussed the availability of big data and its opportunities to use innovative analytics and technologies. It was shown how big data can be visualized in different government contexts. The focus was summarized on two challanges: regulatory impact assessment, as well as on information processing support on rulemaking. The application of a novel big data analytics framework – Mixed-Initiative Social Media Analytics (MISMA) – will address these two rulemaking challenges.
Presentation slides

Supporting Cognition in the Face of Political Data and Discourse: A Mental Models Perspective on Designing Information Visualization Systems (Günther Schreder, Florian Windhager, Michael Smuc and Eva Mayr)

cedem16_mentalmodels

During the presentation of the paper examples for information visualizations were shown. How  users react to information and data – how they react and interact with it and make sense of abstract data through the use of visual interfaces, or so called mental models. These mental models are an emerging topic for research on the comprehension and designing process in information visualization. Different design features can accomplish this in the field of political communication and its complex data.

Presentation slides

Current Barriers to Open Government Data Use and Visualization by Political Intermediaries (Jérôme Brugger, Marianne Fraefel, Hansjakob Fehr, Daniel Schöneck, Christoph Stähli Weissbrod and Reinhard Riedl)

cedem16_OGD.jpg

The aim of the research was to rise the role and the importance of open governement data vizualisations – its promise, potential, ecosystems, political intermediaries, as well as barriers. Actions suggested to increase the use of data and visualisation include the offering and support not only for data but also it’s processing, statistical analysis and visualisation. It was pointed out that there is furhter research in standardisation for visualisation processes with the aim to provide intermediaries with professional visualization at lower prices is an important aspect.
Presentation slides