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CeDEMAsia2016: Paper Presentations Parallel Session A, Day 2

Heike Hermann: The promises of digital political communication and the reality in South Korea

While South Koreans are frequent users of social media, politicians have not yet embraced these communication channels to engage with citizens. The most popular digital communication tool is Kakao Talk, which is used by 37 million users. Kakao Talk provides closed space for communication. Facebook and Twitter are public social media and popular in Korea, but politicians are only followed by a few numbers of people. A quarter of politicians on public social media is not or not very active. Most items posted are news items often about the politicians themselves and the posts are often not about policy. 3/4 of politicians do not respond to comments, hence politicians don’t really engage with citizens via Facebook. Most politicians have a Twitter account and two thirds actually use it. However, only 10 percent of politicians have more than 15000 followers which is not a lot considering the Korean population. Twitter is mainly used for engagement with news agents and similar.

Dal Yong Jin: Understanding of Smartphone Divide: From Digital Divide to Digital Inclusion in the Smartphone Era

Over the last 20 years, Korea had great development in the ICT infrastructure. It was expected that smartphones would bridge the social and digital divide, but it has not quite been up to expectations. There are two major problems in the discourse of the digital divide: (1) Inequality in physical access to the technology and (2) the knowledge to use ICT effectively. Koreans must spend among the most money on communications. While the first divide will disappear in the future, the second divide – usage skills – is systematic and structural problem.

Ben Huffman: E-Participation in the Governance Process: Redefining its Worth and Modality

Focus of the talk is the Philippines that made good progress in the global e-participation index. Physical access is a core factor in these rankings, but capability to make use of the access is almost equally important. In the Philippines, free internet access is facilitated to make use of governmental services. The e-government services are provided in English, but this is language barrier, as there are 2 national languages and 8 dialects in the Philippines. The e-government service might also intend to train English of the citizens, which should be realised differently. Other barriers are the need to login in at some public access points, as not all that have access to an interne access point have login data.

Robert Krimmer: Internet Voting: Elections in the (European) Cloud

Estonia is often narrowed down to e-stonia as they have implemented and use many electronic services. The talk discusses, why do some countries use e-voting and why do some countries not use e-voting? The use of technology and innovations in voting processes happens already in ancient Greece and Rome, and the use of paper ballots is also use of technology that was not there before. Casting votes in parliaments often happens with the use of electronic devices nowadays. By using the electronic voting you change the electorate, as people from elsewhere can participate. Especially for citizens that are abroad, voting ins difficult, as they can go to embassy or send their ballot via mail (which is getting slower). Internet voting is not about democracy but it is a service to make citizens participate in elections.

CeDEMAsia16: Paper Presentations Parallel Session B, Day 2

Malgorzata Gorazcek: Using Fuzzy Cognitive Maps as Decision Support Tool for Smart Cities – Application in Smart Mobility

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This project is about engaging citizens via social media feedback and open data for smart city concepts. Some cities are more developed than other cities in the area, which is one of the challenges of the project. In a first step, cases are developed on the basis of fuzzy cognitive maps, which will be the basis for data driven decision support tools. The next step will be decisions about algorithms. Fuzzy cognitive maps are a concept of decision making. (mehr …)

CeDEM Asia 2016, Keynote 2nd Day

Keynote 2nd Day

Michael Best: Gender, Peace & Data: ICTD Research and the United Nation (United Nations University)

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The United Nations University is a young institution headquartered in Tokyo, and in Macau the focus is on research output and policy impact, focused on UN member organisations and member states. The university is currently in start-up mode🙂 and includes an interdisciplinary team from computer to social scientists.

The university has a Gender Lab, focusing on promoting women’s empmowerment, gender equality and enabling sustainable community led development, but also an LGBTQIA project has been envisaged. (mehr …)

CeDEM Asia 2016, Day 2, Morning Sessions

#Cedem and #Disc Panel

Manuela G. Hartwig: Communication about climate change during COP21 on Twitter in Germany and Japan

The „Climategate“ controversy lead to higher criticism and awareness about climate change scepticism and climate change denial. The project looks at what the local twitter contexts of climate change could tell us about the cultural contexts and understanding of climate change. The mass or major news media seem to dominate the discussion on Germany. There are also more ironic and local statements in Germany. In Japan we find a strong anti-nuclear sentiment and climate change acknowledgement. A sentiment analysis of the term „Klimawandel“ showed that Japanese tweets are richer in content.

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CeDEM Asia 2016, Discussion: Enthusiasm for Political Topics

How to fill people with enthusiasm for political topics via social media (discussion hosted by KAS, Singapore)

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The discussion was led by Sayasat Nurbek (Institute of Public Policy, Kazakhstan).
Astik Sinha (Bharita Janata Party,  India) told us about the masses of Indian youth voters who are engaged on Facebook.
Ben Guerin (New Zealand National Party, New Zealand) was active in political campaigning and started a consulting company. He looks at how politicians engage on social media and the value of these activities.
Rajit Hewagama (United National Party, Sri Lanka) runs a consulting compagny for digital communications and strategic communications. In Sri Lanka some journalists disappeared and have been murdered, so they are scared of publishing anti government data. Social media allowed to bypass the mainstream media without relying on forms of media that could be censored. Now some ministers complain that media freedom came to far (sometimes those who have been in the oppostition before).
Pheaktra Neth (Spokesman of the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia, Khmer Rouge Tribunal, Cambodia). The special body is set up between the UN and Cambodia to investigate the war crimes in the region. There is a young cohort of Facebook users in Cambodia. Sometimes there are postings about plans to kill someone, f.i. an officer, in a ceremony. The government has, however, no plans to control the social media or the internet. Campaigns are now focusing on social media and see it as a chance for the next 2017 and 2018 elections.

Truth vs. visibility?

(mehr …)