Review

EGOV-CeDEM-ePART 2018: Keynote Wolfgang Drechsler

Look further than the western public administration.
“Estonia has turned its government into a website” – but this is not true. EE is not a world leader, it is doing very well, but it is not number 1. Important from drawing lessons.

Number one is part of the malayian peninsula (Singapore)
Why does Estonia oversell? The push-pull factors, not only what you are saying, but what people want to hear.

5 questions to Wolfgang Drechsler with Noella Edelmann


Wolfgang Drechsler
Ragnar Nurkse Department of Innovation & Governance (Tallinn University of Technology, Estonia)

Wolfgang Drechsler is Professor of Governance at the Ragnar Nurkse Department of Innovation and Governance at Tallinn University of Technology, Estonia. He has been advisor to the President of Estonia, Executive Secretary with the German Wissenschaftsrat during German Reunification, and, as an APSA Congressional Fellow, Senior Legislative Analyst in the United States Congress. His areas of interest include Public Administration, Technology, and Innovation; Non-Western Public Administration, especially Confucian and Buddhist, and Public Management Reform generally, as well as e-Governance, Municipal Autonomy, and Academic Administration.


EGOV-CeDEM-ePART 2018 Summary

EGOV-CeDEM-ePart 2018 represented the merge of the IFIP WG 8.5 Electronic Government (EGOV), the IFIP WG 8.5 IFIP Electronic Participation (ePart) and the Conference for E-Democracy and Open Government Conference (CeDEM). The conference was held annually, and was hosted 3-5 September 2018 at the Danube University Krems in Austria.

Website and Tracks
Conference Program (PDF)

cedem18-flip

Download: EGOV-CeDEM-ePART 2018 Magazine!
View: EGOV-CeDEM-ePART 2018 Summary (issuu)

EGOV-CeDEM-ePART 2018: Keynote Bill Dutton

Bill Dutton starts with the story by Martha Payne, a 9-year old changed food policy in British schools – internet can impact institutions.

The role of the internet is always changing, at the moment the Internet is seen as empowering institutions. It is not technological determination but it does help change – e.g. access to information. It is about reconfiguring access to information, people, services and technology; it is a power shift.

Bill considers the constantly changing role of the internet, that at the moment is seen as empowering institutions. Whilst we should not see it as technological determination, the internet does help change – e.g. by providing access to information. It is about reconfiguring access to information, people, services and technology; it is a power shift.

He presents the known 4 estates, clergy (experts, public intellectuals), nobility (business, industry, and internet industrial elites), commons (government), press, mob (civil society, networked individuals); he adds the fifth, which includes bloggers, whistle-blowers and other individuals that improve government and governance – reshaping and improving the institutions. Not every internet user is the 5th estate – it is those users who use the internet “strategically”,– often younger, urban, and from a minority.

5 questions to Bill Dutton with Noella Edelmann


Bill Dutton
College of Communication Arts & Sciences (Michigan State University, USA)

William H. Dutton is the Quello Professor of Media and Information Policy in the Department of Media and Information, College of Communication Arts and Sciences at Michigan State University, where he is Director of the Quello Center, and an Emeritus Professor at the University of Southern California. He is also the recipient of the International Communication Association’s (ICA) first Fred Williams’ award for contributions to the study of communication and technology, the William F. Ogburn Lifetime Achievement Award from the Communication and Information Technologies Section of the American Sociological Association in 2014, was named an ICA Fellow in 2015, and received an Endowed Faculty Medallion from MSU in 2017.


EGOV-CeDEM-ePART 2018 Summary

EGOV-CeDEM-ePart 2018 represented the merge of the IFIP WG 8.5 Electronic Government (EGOV), the IFIP WG 8.5 IFIP Electronic Participation (ePart) and the Conference for E-Democracy and Open Government Conference (CeDEM). The conference was held annually, and was hosted 3-5 September 2018 at the Danube University Krems in Austria.

Website and Tracks
Conference Program (PDF)

cedem18-flip

Download: EGOV-CeDEM-ePART 2018 Magazine!
View: EGOV-CeDEM-ePART 2018 Summary (issuu)

#GovCamp Vienna 2017 Review

Nichts dem Zufall überlassen! lautete das Motto des GovCamp Vienna am 1. Dezember 2017. Bots, Blockchain, Demokratie, Open Data, Privatsphäre und Transparenz – dies waren einige der Themen, die wir beim diesjährigen GovCamp aufgegriffen haben. Wer beschäftigt sich damit in Österreich? Welche Technologien greift die öffentliche Verwaltung auf? Wie kann die Zivilgesellschaft davon profitieren? Hier findest Du unsere Review, ein paar Video-Casts und viele Bilder.

Review

Die #GovCamp Vienna 2017 Review als PDF downloaden!
Die #GovCamp Vienna 2017 Review im Magazine-Style durchblättern (issuu)

Das waren die #GovCamp Vienna 2017 Sessions

  1. Digital Days – Rückblick 2017, Input für Planung 2018 – Nicole Swoboda
  2. data.gv.at – Feedback für künftige Weiterentwicklungen – Robert Harm
  3. Wien Bot – Vom StartUp zum Unicorn – Sindre Wimberger, Betty Schwarz
  4. Open Source und eGovernment CMS Lösungen – Josef Dabernig
  5. communidata.at – Svitlana Vakulenko
  6. eDemokratie – Beyond the Horizon! – Claus-Markus Piswanger
  7. Ist die Digitalisierung ohne entsprechende Strategie möglich? – Hermann Madlberger
  8. Lokale Agenda 21 – Jugend, Partizipation und Demokratie – Sandra Löcker-Herschkowitz, Katja Arzberger und Filip Govaerts
  9. Liquid-Participation.at – Qualitätsstandards für Online-Partizipation? – Ursula Seethaler
    und Max Harnoncourt
  10. Feedback der Wirtschaft zu OGD Aktivitäten Wiens
  11. GovLab Austria – Transparenz und Partizipation in Rechtssetzung
  12. StadtKatalog und der Seestadt-Bot – Philipp Naderer-Puiu
  13. Jugend hackt – Magdalena Reiter
  14. Blockchain – Nutzen für die innovatie Verwaltung – Brigitte Lutz
  15. RIS Verwaltung und Partizipation mittels GIT
  16. Soll Österreich der „Open Government Partnership“ beitreten? – Johannes Lutz
  17. Einsteiger Workshop Virtuelle Realität – Peter Kühnberger

Das sind einige Video-Casts der #GovCamp Vienna 2017 Sessions

Bilder

Theorizing Society A. S. Krossa ©Palgrave Macmillan

Review: Theorizing Society in a Global Context – A.S. Krossa

Theorizing Society A. S. Krossa ©Palgrave Macmillan

Theorizing Society A. S. Krossa ©Palgrave Macmillan

Anne Sophie Krossa’s book on the evolution of globalization and societal developments is a welcome contribution to the ongoing debate on what actually constitutes society in a (supposedly) ever-globalizing world. In this text, Krossa challenges us to rethink the relationship between society and community and the dynamics of heterogeneity and homogeneity that are driven by it.

Offering a concise reading of the works of Tönnies, Simmel, Coser, and Dubiel, the author puts her own thoughts neatly into the broader tradition, without being excessively bound by it.

Contrary to many other works in the field Krossa does not argue normatively for either unity or diversity, but understands society itself as being constituted by the tensions between homogeneity and heterogeneity. In order to successfully conceptualize society, these two elements cannot be treated as separate entities but as core elements of social interaction, thereby becoming an integral part of society as such. Krossa explicitly avoids falling into polarized positions and makes clear that the poles (e.g. nation state and world society) are important points of reference, but that society has to be seen as a moving object between these poles. Describing society as a dynamic concept based on communication, Krossa shows that globalization is not necessarily a qualitatively new phenomenon, but that modernity has accelerated its quantitative characteristics. While she leaves the questions of the novelty of globalization somewhat open, she addresses the relation between modernization and the speed of globalization. Most importantly, Krossa convincingly argues that modernization should not be misunderstood as Westernization.

What comes as a surprise, however, is that the book is not referencing authors like Charles Taylor and Michael Mann, who have dedicated a majority of their research to similar questions like Krossa. Especially the treatment of globalization as modernity in the first part of the book could have profited from including a review of Taylor’s work – which Krossa is undoubtly familiar with.
The strongest part of the book deals with the idea of Europe and European society, outlining how difficult it is to actually define European society beyond pure rhetoric. The interaction of supranational institutions and nation-states with their national identities and unique cultural backgrounds makes the European situation an ideal case for the study of the complex relationship between homogeneity and heterogeneity. As Krossa succinctly points out, it is precisely the unfinished character of European society that makes it an ideal case study for the theoretical claims of the book.

At times when the political aspect of European society seems to be in a fundamental crisis, re-thinking the relationship between society and nation states on the one hand and society and supra-national entities on the other hand is a necessary task that is met by Krossa’s work.

Available from all good booksellers or online at http://www.palgrave.com
Hampshire, Palgrave Macmillan, 2013, ISBN 9781137003171

About the author:
Anne Sophie Krossa

Chair in Sociological Theory at the University of Siegen, Germany
Lecturer at Lancaster University, UK
Contact: http://goo.gl/X189us

Reviewed by:
Ralph Schöllhammer

Researcher at Danube University Krems, Centre for E-Governance, Austria
Contact: http://goo.gl/qbilnu