RESEARCH

CeDEM17: Keynote-Review #PDF

CeDEM is the international Conference for e-Democracy and Open Government. It brings together e-democracy, e-participation and open government specialists working in academia, politics, government and business to critically analyse the innovations, issues, ideas and challenges in the networked societies of the digital age.

CeDEM17 was at the Danube University Krems from 17th to May 19th 2017. We are very proud to announce Ines Mergel, Todd O’Boyle, Keren Flavell and Dave Karpf as our keynote-speaker.

Please find here our summary and review:

CeDEM Keynotes-Review CeDEM17

  1. Prof. Dr. Ines Mergel — Digital Transformation: The case of government start-ups
  2. Todd O‘Boyle — Digital Tools and Digital Democracy: US Cities and Civil Society in 2017
  3. Keren Flavell — Reinvigorating the Role of Media to Educate and Engage Citizens
  4. Dave Karpf — The Promises and Pitfalls of Digital Listening: Analytic Activism in 2017 and Beyond

Download: Keynotes-Review CeDEM17 PDF
CeDEM17: Keynote PDF (Download)


Keren Flavell: Reinvigorating the Role of Media to Educate and Engage Citizens #keynote

Keren Flavell was one of our keynote-speaker at the CeDEM17 at the Danube University Krems in May 2017. We summarized and reflected her keynote.


Download: Keynotes-Review CeDEM17 PDF
CeDEM17: Keynote PDF (Download)

 

Reinvigorating the Role of Media to Educate and Engage Citizens

Keren Flavells keynote “Reinvigorating the Role of Media and Educate and Engage Citizens” focused on engagement of citizens on Social Media.

Keren Flacells keynote on “Reinvigorating the Role of Media and Educate and Engage Citizens” pointed out how to engage people to participate and get engaged on Social Media. One of her question was how revenue versus output could be balanced. One example she gave was to add reason-functionality to engagement processes. She presented applications and tools (e.g. Town Hall App) to support governments in better engaging with their citizens.

In her view the most important factors of tools can be summed up as: Culture – Capacity – Context.
For this reason she showed for example which effect simplification on social media had and how this was reflected in increased use and engagement on the internet.

After her keynote the audience asked to discuss questions about security and manipulation, as well as about education about ICT-based tools.


Keren Flavell (TownHall App Pty Ltd, US) on “Reinvigorating the Role of Media to Educate and Engage Citizens”
Keren is an award-winning web producer, author, speaker and strategist. She is internationally recognized as a global thought leader and digital innovator with more than 20 years of experience in the tech industry focusing on community, content and connection via advanced digital platforms. Her company Treet.tv pioneered connection between the virtual / in-world experience with live streaming and content distribution to hundreds of thousands of viewers — virtual and real-worlds alike. Keren has spoken on virtual worlds and social entrepreneurism at SXSW, AIMIA Conference, IAP2, Adelaide Futureproof and is a frequent blogger and talk show host Byte Into It — a technology talk show out of Melborne, Australia. Keren works between Ho Chi Minh City, San Francisco and Melbourne as a producer, consultant and serial entrepreneur and when in the right time zone, she really knows how to throw an amazing party.


CeDEM Keynotes-Review CeDEM17

  1. Prof. Dr. Ines Mergel — Digital Transformation: The case of government start-ups
  2. Todd O‘Boyle — Digital Tools and Digital Democracy: US Cities and Civil Society in 2017
  3. Keren Flavell — Reinvigorating the Role of Media to Educate and Engage Citizens
  4. Dave Karpf — The Promises and Pitfalls of Digital Listening: Analytic Activism in 2017 and Beyond

Download: Keynotes-Review CeDEM17 PDF
CeDEM17: Keynote PDF (Download)

Dave Karpf: Reinvigorating the Role of Media to Educate and Engage Citizens #keynote

Dave Karpf was one of our keynote-speaker at the CeDEM17 at the Danube University Krems in May 2017. We summarized and reflected his keynote.


Download: Keynotes-Review CeDEM17 PDF
CeDEM17: Keynote PDF (Download)

 

Reinvigorating the Role of Media to Educate and Engage Citizens

Dave Karpfs “The promises and Pitfalls of Digital Listening: Analytic Activism in 2017” pointed out in his keynote that digital politics include new forms of “speech”, but also new forms of “listening”.

Dave Karpfs “The promises and Pitfalls of Digital Listening: Analytic Activism in 2017” pointed out in his keynote that digital politics include new forms of “speech”, but also new forms of “listening”. He further pointed about “listening on data”, which is used to analyse the influence on media. This digital listening described by David Karpf shows the need of a new political strategy: Analytical Activism!

In his view digital politics need to use digital tools for monitoring and inventing media and content strategies. He presented also parts of his book, where he explores the inner workings of organizations like Change.org and Upworthy.com. What are the trends that were discovered and summarized in literature, The main trends were: first the focus on clicktivism and second on the celebration of viral social media movements.

He also criticized the “siren song” of the populist demagogues, for example, that governance, politics and social problems are simple.


Dave Karpf is associate professor and director of graduate studies at the George Washington University School of Media & Public Affairs. His primary research focus is on how the internet is changing civil society organizations and large-scale movements for political change. He is the author of The MoveOn Effect: The Unexpected Transformation of American Political Advocacy (Oxford University Press, 2012) and Analytic Activism: Digital Listening and the New Political Strategy (Oxford University Press, 2016). He also writes about technology, politics, and strategy for a wide range of outlets.

Image: private
Twitter: twitter.com/davekarpf


CeDEM Keynotes-Review CeDEM17

  1. Prof. Dr. Ines Mergel — Digital Transformation: The case of government start-ups
  2. Todd O‘Boyle — Digital Tools and Digital Democracy: US Cities and Civil Society in 2017
  3. Keren Flavell — Reinvigorating the Role of Media to Educate and Engage Citizens
  4. Dave Karpf — The Promises and Pitfalls of Digital Listening: Analytic Activism in 2017 and Beyond

Download: Keynotes-Review CeDEM17 PDF
CeDEM17: Keynote PDF (Download)

Todd O’Boyle: Digital Tools and Digital Democracy – US Cities and Civil Society in 2017 #keynote

Todd O’Boyle was one of our keynote-speaker at the CeDEM17 at the Danube University Krems in May 2017. We summarized and reflected his keynote.


Download: Keynotes-Review CeDEM17 PDF
CeDEM17: Keynote PDF (Download)

 

Digital Tools and Digital Democracy – US Cities and Civil Society in 201

Todd O’Boyle talked about examples of how innovation in citizen engagement could be fostered by a philanthropic partnership, referring to the case of the Next Generation Engagement Awards.

Todd O’Boyle from Next Century Cities, a non-profit association of local governments, focuses amongst others on the digital rights discussion. Today, he will shed light on local level innovation from an NGO perspective.

What is meant by “Engaged dejection”?

The fact, that citizenry is more engaged than ever online, but at the same time, public trust remains rather low, is referred to as the paradox of engaged dejection.

Competition for innovations in citizen engagement

A competition targeted to award prizes for innovative digital citizen engagement. 19 submissions followed the call for innovative out-of-the-box thinking on electronic citizen engagement, including novel approaches on communication as f.i. visualizations (“InVision Raleigh”). In this case, collaborative urban planning was aimed at. Members of the public could on the one hand give feedback on proposals, and on the other hand make different suggestions. Another example was developed in Austin, Texas. There, a digital ambassador was implemented for low-income residents to be better connected with public transit. Low-income residents were offered a training of how to access e-government services in general and they were introduced to finding different options of public transit. Due to sponsoring, in line with “Smart Work, Learn, Play”, the digital ambassador will be extended. To give another example, Louisville, Kentucky, pursued the objective of the development of a cross-cutting curriculum to also include those who never go online.

What are the lessons learned?

There is a major opportunity for foundations and philanthropies to support local governments and to broadcast promising ideas. The Benton Next Generation Engagement Awards formed a new model for rewarding innovative digital civic engagement, which potentially enables the citizens to have a greater say. Through corporate sponsorship, helpful innovation can be funded.

After the keynote, it was discussed that the interaction with other community members can have a more engaging effect than just the supply of technology can have.


Todd O’Boyle (Next Century Cities, US) on “Digital Tools and Digital Democracy: US Cities and Civil Society in 2017”
Todd O’Boyle serves as Deputy Director of Next Century Cities, where he is overseeing the launch of the new Next Generation Engagement Awards to promote innovative citizen engagement and digital inclusion strategies in gigabit cities. He also works to shape strategy and organizational direction and policy priorities.
Prior to joining Next Century Cities, former Federal Communications Commission Chairman Michael Copps picked Todd to launch his Media and Democracy Reform Initiative at Common Cause, a non-partisan good government organization. In that capacity, Todd directed public interest communications policy campaigns, including successful efforts to guarantee the Open Internet (network neutrality); protect and promote competition; and stop Comcast’s bid to acquire rival Time Warner Cable. Regularly quoted in the national, local, and specialized media, as Program Director, he also managed legislative and regulatory outreach, grassroots engagement, and development relations.
Todd has experience in the academic and political worlds, having taught communications policy and worked in grassroots campaigns for nearly a decade. He has a Ph.D. in Public Policy from the University of Delaware.

Image: twitter.com/ttoboyle


CeDEM Keynotes-Review CeDEM17

  1. Prof. Dr. Ines Mergel — Digital Transformation: The case of government start-ups
  2. Todd O‘Boyle — Digital Tools and Digital Democracy: US Cities and Civil Society in 2017
  3. Keren Flavell — Reinvigorating the Role of Media to Educate and Engage Citizens
  4. Dave Karpf — The Promises and Pitfalls of Digital Listening: Analytic Activism in 2017 and Beyond

Download: Keynotes-Review CeDEM17 PDF
CeDEM17: Keynote PDF (Download)

Ines Mergel: Digital Transformation: The case of government start-ups #keynote

Ines Mergel was one of our keynote-speaker at the CeDEM17 at the Danube University Krems in May 2017. We summarized and reflected her keynote.


Download: Keynotes-Review CeDEM17 PDF
CeDEM17: Keynote PDF (Download)

 

Digital Transformation: The case of government start-ups

In order to reach digital transformation, the perspective needs to be changed from looking at one project to focusing the to-be-achieved solution. What do we need inside government to make digital transformation happen?

Ines Mergel, full professor of public administration at the University of Konstanz), decided to talk about digital transformation in the public sector and explained, you can see huge gaps between how fast technology is developing and the government being far behind this development. This can of course not be stated in a general way, though there are much more advanced countries in Europe, f.i. Denmark and Estonia. Her research in the context of Northern America showed, it might be unclear how digitization fits to internal processes.

Risks of pressure to digitize

Pressure to digitize processes can even lead to the convertion of false analogue forms to digital ones. Additionally, from a citizens’ perspective, if from the beginning you don’t know how the process connected to the request you file is structured, it may reduce trust in institutions.

Insights into US-case

Within this project, the question was how the government unit can achieve digital transformation. The overall research goal is to create an international comparative study on government start-up organizations including – besides the US-case – especially cases from UK, Australia and Italy.

The Project in the US-context revealed f.i. most of the budget was used on the maintenance of legacy IT. In contrast to this, just a small part of the budget was used for development. In the US-case, there are centralized teams directly supporting national priorities as well as decentralized teams involved in innovation in IT acquisition, as well as agency-level teams.

Digital Transformation: more than a project

One of the major findings is that for the achievement of digital transformation, a project-level approach does not suffice. The organizations concerned should think about what should be the result, what citizens really need – in contrast to thinking just about the next step. It is not an IT-project. In order to change for digital transformation, efforts have to be made to be willing to rethink and then change processes of government.

Flexible HR policies, cultural hurdles, agile leadership
Under a flexible HR policy, people can be involved for some months or some years, which is advantageous for the maintenance of a start-up mentality. Cultural hurdles of the public sector like “We have never done like this” show governments being rather risk averse. To allow to take more risk, an agile leadership could allow more experimenting.

Area of tension: public sector and Innovation

Finally, the “Innovation paradox in the public sector” was introduced, mentioning that according to the collected empirical data, from the perspective of the private sector, innovation cannot happen in the public sector itself, but needs the private sector to happen.


Professor Dr. Ines Mergel is full Professor of Public Administration in the Department of Politics and Public Administration at the University of Konstanz, Germany. Previously, she served as Associate Professor with tenure at the Department of Public Administration and International Affairs at Syracuse University’s Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, Syracuse, NY, USA. Before joining the faculty at the Maxwell School, Professor Mergel taught at Harvard’s Extension School in the Management Master Program and stayed as a doctoral student and postdoctoral fellow at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government.
Professor Mergel’s research focuses on public management topics, specifically the managerial and technological processes in the implementation and institutionalization of innovative public management practices. Current projects include digital transformation, open innovation, big data, and the use of inhouse social networking technologies in the public sector.

Professor Mergel is Associate Editor of the journal Government Information Quarterly, serves on the editorial boards of Public Administration Review, Information Polity, Public Performance & Management Review, and the board of directors of the Public Management Research Association. In 2016, Professor Mergel was appointed as a Senior Fellow at the German Research Institute for Public Administration.

Image: Private


CeDEM Keynotes-Review CeDEM17

  1. Prof. Dr. Ines Mergel — Digital Transformation: The case of government start-ups
  2. Todd O‘Boyle — Digital Tools and Digital Democracy: US Cities and Civil Society in 2017
  3. Keren Flavell — Reinvigorating the Role of Media to Educate and Engage Citizens
  4. Dave Karpf — The Promises and Pitfalls of Digital Listening: Analytic Activism in 2017 and Beyond

Download: Keynotes-Review CeDEM17 PDF
CeDEM17: Keynote PDF (Download)