Author: egovsa

Research Fellow

PhD Scholarships: Migration Studies

We are currently opening three PhD student scholarships to join our dynamic interdisciplinary research team at the Faculty of Business and Globalization at Danube University Krems. These positions provide young researchers with the unique opportunity to develop state-of-the art methodological competences.

An important goal of this PhD program is assisting in evidence-informed policy design with a holistic understanding of migration policy as a pillar of social peace and the stability of states. Europe is at the center of continuous migrant and refugee movements of unprecedented scale, requiring policy makers to gain an in-depth understanding of the factors driving migration (security, income inequality, demography), facilitating migration (information and communication technology, social media) and the related impact in various fields (labor market, society, security, economy etc.). The program aims to pursue new ways of evidence-based policy making by understanding migration from a variety of methodological backgrounds, such as social or natural sciences and may focus on areas such as demography, economics, anthropology, psychology, political science, history etc. and applying diverse research methods [experimental research (e. g. game theory, behavioral economics), semantic research, data analytics (e. g. big data analysis, multivariate modeling), systems analysis (e.g. system dynamics, agent-based modeling, network analysis) and others].

The PhD student will work with senior researchers in an interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary environment, including various aspects of migration studies, informatics, economics and business studies, sustainability science, and public health. These are 3-year, 30h/week positions.

The program is funded by the Austrian Federal Ministry of the Interior and the European Union’s Asylum-, Migration- and Integrationfund (AMIF).

This was the CeDEM Asia 2016

Here you find photos and all blog posts (including most presentations) from the CeDEM Asia 2016.

Photos and Videos

Blogposts

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Demokratische Online-Beteiligung an politischen Entscheidungsprozessen

Forschungsprojekt „ePartizipation“ zur Förderung der Demokratie über IKT-gestützte Teilnahmeprozesse für BürgerInnen erfolgreich abgeschlossen

Gesellschaftliche Beteiligung und Teilnahme an demokratischen Entscheidungsprozessen im digitalen Zeitalter stellt Organisationen aus allen Bereichen vor große Herausforderungen. Es stehen nicht nur die erhöhte Partizipationsbereitschaft, sondern auch die möglichen Einsparungspotentiale in Verwaltungsverfahren im Fokus von IKT-gestützter Beteiligung der Gesellschaft. Das Projekt „ePartizipation – Authentifizierung bei demokratischer Online-Beteiligung“, gefördert durch das österreichische Sicherheitsforschungs-Förderprogramm KIRAS – eine Initiative des Bundesministeriums für Verkehr, Innovation und Technologie, hat sich 2 Jahre detailliert mit den wichtigen Kernaspekten dieses Themenkomplexes auseinandergesetzt und wurde erfolgreich abgeschlossen. Das Projektkonsortium setzte sich aus dem AIT Austrian Institute of Technologie (Koordination), dem Bundesministerium für Inneres, dem Zentrum für E-Governance der Donau-Universität Krems,  der Österreichischen Staatsdruckerei GmbH, rubicon IT GmbH und der Universität Wien, Arbeitsgruppe Rechtsinformatik zusammen.

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CeDEMAsia2016: Panel, Day 2

 

Marko Skoric, Tetsuro Kobayashi, Muneo Kaigo: Social Media and Citizen Engagement in Asia: A Comparative Study of Five Societies

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The presenters are part of a research team that conducts an international study to learn about political disagreement and what people do about it in social media. The study shall support the understanding of patterns of engagement. The international study analyses 6 countries: China, Hong Kong, Japan, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, hence the study is currently titled “Citizen Engagement in Confucian Asia.”

Social media expand social networks and they go beyond face-to-face meetings; hence many thought the social media would diversify the social network of individuals. However, the opposite seems to be the case. People that actively express themselves on social media are likely to unfriend people who have different opinions. This becomes especially true during political campaigns and when users are politically active. Some people try to persuade others with different political opinions and when they fail after some time, they unfriend these people. Social media feeds look more like face-to-face conversations nowadays than 5 years ago as similar opinions are shown in the threads.

Koreans that live in Japan for long time are called Zainichi and there are about 350,000 of them. Hate speech and racism in Japan focuses on Koreans and Chinese and there are hate groups against Zainichi that got especially stronger after the World Cup in 2002 and through other events. The Matome Website is a place for hate speech and people that consume their news in such an ecosystem find themselves in a vicious circle. Firstly, they are racists or have racist tendencies, which is why they go to websites like Matome. If they consume the biased news from such a website they become even more racist. The more they use these media the more racist they become.

This corresponds to the findings that certain media attract people with certain mind-sets. In Japan, NHK is a public broadcaster and people that watch these news find racism distasteful, like users of Youtube in Japan also generally do. On the other hand, Sankei Shimbun is a media that is consumed by more racists. Matome is among the worst mass websites concerning racist users, and looking at the actual users of Matome website, one realises that they are equally spread among the different educational backgrounds.

The study is still ongoing and further results will be published in the near future.

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CeDEMAsia2016: Paper Presentations Parallel Session A, Day 2

Heike Hermann: The promises of digital political communication and the reality in South Korea

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While South Koreans are frequent users of social media, politicians have not yet embraced these communication channels to engage with citizens. The most popular digital communication tool is Kakao Talk, which is used by 37 million users. Kakao Talk provides closed space for communication. Facebook and Twitter are public social media and popular in Korea, but politicians are only followed by a few numbers of people. A quarter of politicians on public social media is not or not very active. Most items posted are news items often about the politicians themselves and the posts are often not about policy. 3/4 of politicians do not respond to comments, hence politicians don’t really engage with citizens via Facebook. Most politicians have a Twitter account and two thirds actually use it. However, only 10 percent of politicians have more than 15000 followers which is not a lot considering the Korean population. Twitter is mainly used for engagement with news agents and similar.

Dal Yong Jin: Understanding of Smartphone Divide: From Digital Divide to Digital Inclusion in the Smartphone Era

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Over the last 20 years, Korea had great development in the ICT infrastructure. It was expected that smartphones would bridge the social and digital divide, but it has not quite been up to expectations. There are two major problems in the discourse of the digital divide: (1) Inequality in physical access to the technology and (2) the knowledge to use ICT effectively. Koreans must spend among the most money on communications. While the first divide will disappear in the future, the second divide – usage skills – is systematic and structural problem.

Ben Huffman: E-Participation in the Governance Process: Redefining its Worth and Modality

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Focus of the talk is the Philippines that made good progress in the global e-participation index. Physical access is a core factor in these rankings, but capability to make use of the access is almost equally important. In the Philippines, free internet access is facilitated to make use of governmental services. The e-government services are provided in English, but this is language barrier, as there are 2 national languages and 8 dialects in the Philippines. The e-government service might also intend to train English of the citizens, which should be realised differently. Other barriers are the need to login in at some public access points, as not all that have access to an interne access point have login data.

PRESENTATION-LINK

Robert Krimmer: Internet Voting: Elections in the (European) Cloud

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Estonia is often narrowed down to e-stonia as they have implemented and use many electronic services. The talk discusses, why do some countries use e-voting and why do some countries not use e-voting? The use of technology and innovations in voting processes happens already in ancient Greece and Rome, and the use of paper ballots is also use of technology that was not there before. Casting votes in parliaments often happens with the use of electronic devices nowadays. By using the electronic voting you change the electorate, as people from elsewhere can participate. Especially for citizens that are abroad, voting ins difficult, as they can go to embassy or send their ballot via mail (which is getting slower). Internet voting is not about democracy but it is a service to make citizens participate in elections.

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